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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)

What is Pulse Drying?

What is "Flash Atomization"?

Are Pulse Dried Particles Different?

Does Pulse Drying Use More Energy?

Is Pulse Drying a Proven Technology?

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What is Pulse Drying?

Pulse drying is a "cousin" to spray drying. And pulse drying can be used virtually everywhere that spray drying has been used in the past. Yet, pulse drying is much more efficient and versatile, which benefits your bottom-line.

And what will happen to your present spray drying equipment? Keep it! We can retrofit onto existing equipment, preserving your capital investment. Plus, pulse drying uses the same downstream equipment as existing spray dryers, including the drying chamber, cyclone, bag house, and packaging. Your powders are different in that they are "Flash Atomized" and dried with a speeding jet of hot gas. Your product dries in a fraction of the time with significantly improved thermal efficiencies, and with particle characteristics not availble in spray dryers. We can adjust our systems to change particle size, particle size distribution, and even particle shape.

Our dryer's "Flash Atomization" happens in a rhythmic, pulsing action by a super-heated gas. This is the key to efficiency, particle properties, and system reliability.

What is "Flash Atomization"?

Atomization turns your liquid into tiny droplets which typically dry over several seconds into round particles. Our pulse drying systems deliver your liquid into a pulsing jet of hot gas where it is dried in microseconds - "atomization in a flash!" Where a spray dryer may use temperatures of 700F-900F, an equivalent pulse dryer may use temperatures of 1200F-1400F. Many benefits from pulse drying are in the Flash Atomization.

Are Pulse Dried Particles Different?

Because the typical spray-dried particle is born in a liquid state, it will always end up looking a lot like a rain drop, with a round and smooth surface. (See photo of spray dried particle to the right.) But a pulse-dried particle is a hybrid -- part smooth, like a "raindrop", and part jagged with more surface area. Using our pulse drying technology, a process engineer has great control over how much of each characteristic the particle gets -- an entirely new dimension in creating powder particles!

The problem with common spray drying is that temperature is only available in a single dimension -- hot enough to dry, cool enough to prevent nozzle clogging. Pulse drying permits a wider temperature dynamic, which in turn allows you to determine how quickly the particle's shape is frozen into powder. You no longer have to settle for a round particle, the only shape you can now make. Pulse drying "flash dries" liquid into dynamic shapes as it atomizes -- shapes which spray dryers can't produce. (See photo of pulse dried particle to the left.)

For example, precipitated silica has been used as an inexpensive filler in tire manufacturing for many, many years. And the amount of this filler in tire rubber has been fine tuned with careful testing and refinement, both in the liquid process, and in the drying process. The more jagged pulse dried particles, though, adhere more intimately to both natural and artificial rubbers because of their irregular shapes and increased surface area. Laboratory tests have shown that pulse dried silica produces greater tensile strength, higher heat transfer, and wear improvements in the rubber. Increasing pulse dried silica as a low-cost filler in tires can reduce the overall tire manufacturing cost while keeping (and even improving) the strength and durability desired.

Depending upon the desired characteristics needed in a tire by a compounder, pulse dried silica can be used in at least two ways:

  • Use more inexpensive silica as filler, and reduce the amount of expensive rubber. The new tire will have no loss in strength, while gaining superior heat conductivity and wear resistance.
  • In high performance tires, a lower silica content makes the tire softer, helping it to "grip" the road. Yet, the improved tensile strength will retain durability in the tire under harsh conditions. Racing teams gain a competitive edge, and they become a natural advertising venue for your silica.

Does Pulse Drying Use More Energy?

Frankly, it uses much less energy. Pulse drying is much more energy efficient than spray drying. For the same energy, you will get 10%, 15%, maybe even 30% more product, a real benefit in these days of high energy cost. Where fossil fuels are commonly used, improved energy efficiency translates, not only into lower energy costs, but also into fewer "greenhouse" gas emissions. Pulse dryers are veritable "green machines"!

The reason for the energy savings? Product contact temperatures and solids content. Ask your engineers and they'll tell you the direct link between peak drying temperatures and energy efficiency. The pulse dryer's unique blend of high speed jets, "flash atomization", and "evaporation protected" particles, permits product contact temperatures you have to experience to believe. Because we don't use atomizing nozzles, we can atomize higher percentages of solids in the slurry - sometimes much higher - which translates directly into lower energy costs.

We've done this for other customers. Give us a try!

Is Pulse Drying a Proven Technology?

Pulse drying is real, not a pie-in-the-sky promise that may one day work. Pulse dryers have been producing unique powders since 1988. Like any new technology, it spent the early years gathering process knowledge -- which is why you haven't heard much about it.

But now it's becoming mainstream in various industries. The dryer's engine, the pulse burner, has only one moving part, and it is extremely reliable. Many have been in service for two decades.

So check it out. Call us for a quote on drying your product. We're ready when you are!



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